KCS makes academic growth in 2012-2013

KCS makes academic growth in 2012-2013
Posted on 11/07/2013
District exceeds expected growth in reading and math

KCS makes academic growth in 2012-2013

District exceeds expected growth in Reading and Math

 

The State Board of Education has approved final test results for the 2012-2013 school year. They show that Kannapolis City Schools exceeded academic growth in reading and math. In addition, the district’s four-year graduation rate was 84.9%, which was above the state average for the third straight year. The district also made a high level of its academic targets called Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs).

 

During 2012, North Carolina implemented several changes for its curriculum and testing. These new standards mean that the results released today look very different from those released in the past. As part of the changes, North Carolina is using a new system to measure academic growth called EVAAS (Education Value Added Assessment System). EVAAS analyzes several years of test results across North Carolina to determine how much growth students are making. It also predicts students’ future growth so the growth of similar students and schools across the state can be compared. Meeting expected growth means that schools are making academic gains that are consistent with those of an average school in North Carolina. Exceeding expected growth means schools are making gains at a higher rate than the state average. It also means they are outperforming their peers across the state. The table below shows that KCS schools are surpassing their predicted achievement and the growth of similar schools in North Carolina.

 

EVAAS Growth Status

4th-8th Grade Math

Exceeds Expected Growth

4th-8th Grade Reading

Exceeds Expected Growth

Algebra 1

Exceeds Expected Growth

English II

Meets Expected Growth

Biology

Does not meet Expected Growth

 

Besides academic growth, the state also measures whether students score proficient (Level III or Level IV) on end of year exams. Growth and proficiency are two separate measures, so it is possible for students to make academic growth and not be considered proficient. Under the new state standards, many more students are falling short of proficiency levels III and IV. The new standards are more rigorous than before, and they include an improved curriculum that is more demanding of students. They also incorporate more rigorous tests. The state added higher scoring benchmarks as well. Those benchmarks require students to get more questions correct in order to be considered proficient. The combination of these changes has resulted in proficiency scores dropping 30 to 40 percentage points statewide. The lower proficiency rates do not mean that students learned less or performed worse than in the past. They simply reflect the more demanding curriculum, tests, and benchmarks. Because of the changes, 2013 test scores cannot be compared with accuracy to previous years’ results, and students will not be held back based on the lower proficiency scores. Instead, the results will serve as a baseline for improved performance in the future.

 

North Carolina schools are also rated using a standard called Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs). AMOs set proficiency levels that all students must meet. Schools are required to have every subgroup to meet designated proficiency targets in order to make their AMOs. At the high school level, schools must meet an overall graduation rate as well as have every subgroup reach designated graduation rate benchmarks. Kannapolis City Schools did very well on the graduation rate and AMO standards. A.L. Brown was above the state average in overall graduation rate, and it exceeded the state average in nearly every subgroup category. In addition, nearly all KCS schools made more than 80% of their AMOs, and three schools achieved 100% of their Annual Measurable Objectives. Below are tables that show the results for Kannapolis City Schools’ graduation rate, AMOs, and proficiency rates (Performance Composite). The performance composite reflects the percentage of students that scored proficient in both reading and math on end of grade tests in 2013.

 

Subgroup

4 Year Cohort Graduation Rate

NC Average

2012-13

A.L. Brown 2012-13

A.L. Brown 2011-12

All Students

82.5

84.9

82.80%

Male

78.6

84.4

80.10%

Female

86.6

85.5

85.90%

Asian

89.9

*Student population too small to report value*

>95%

Black

77.5

86.7

89.50%

Hispanic

75.2

81.3

78%

Multi-Racial

81.5

91.7

69.20%

White

86.2

84.1

80.40%

Economically Disadvantaged

76.1

83.2

83.20%

Limited English Proficient

48.8

58.8

64.30%

Students with Disabilities

62.3

76.9

78.60%

 

 

 

FINAL 2012-2013 ACCOUNTABILITY RESULTS

SCHOOL

Performance Composite

State Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) Met (includes AIG)

Federal Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) Met

% of State AMOs Met (includes AIG)

% of Federal AMOs Met

Forest Park Elementary

51.40%

21 out of 21

21 out of 21

100%

100%

Fred L. Wilson Elementary

35.90%

16 out of 19

16 out of 19

84.20%

84.20%

Jackson Park Elementary

47.90%

19 out of 19

19 out of 19

100%

100%

Shady Brook Elementary

39.90%

19 out of 19

19 out of 19

100%

100%

Woodrow Wilson Elementary

39.20%

20 out of 21

20 out of 21

95.20%

95.20%

Kannapolis Intermediate

29.80%

39 out of 53

23 out of 33

73.60%

69.70%

Kannapolis Middle

39.90%

47 out of 53

27 out of 33

88.70%

81.80%

A.L. Brown High School

35.90%

58 out of 82

22 out of 30

70.70%

73.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

DISTRICT

37%

108 out of 141

51 out of 67

76.6%

76.1%

 

 

The new standards have resulted in dramatically lower proficiency rates for every school district in North Carolina. Because so many changes took place all at once, state leaders have compared it to going from the minor leagues to the major leagues in baseball. As they point out, when hitters move up, batting averages often go down because ballparks are bigger and pitchers are better, not because players’ hitting skills have declined. It is the same with North Carolina’s new standards. After a year of the new standards being in place, students and teachers will adjust to them, and proficiency levels will rise. Eventually, proficiency rates are expected to climb to the ranges where they have been in the past.

 

To help parents understand the new standards, Kannapolis City Schools has sent letters home with students, added information to its website, made automated phone calls to parents, and discussed the changes at parent-teacher conferences. “We want parents to understand the changes,” said KCS Superintendent Dr. Pam Cain. “We also want them to know that these new standards will benefit their children. The new curriculum does a much better job of getting children to think for themselves, solve problems, create, and collaborate. All these things will get them ready for college and careers and serve them well in life.”

 

The strong growth for KCS shows that students are continuing to make gains even with the more rigorous standards. “I am very proud of our staff for the excellent work they are doing with our students,” said Dr. Pam Cain. “Our subgroups are making gains, and our graduation rate continues to rise and stay above the state average. I am also pleased that we are meeting and exceeding growth across the district. However, it is important for us to improve our proficiency rates. I know we will do that. We are focused on providing strong literacy instruction in the early grades, and we are expanding our STEM program with more courses at more grade levels. With our outstanding leaders and staff, I am confident that we will have a high level of success.”  

 

More information about the new accountability standards is available on the Kannapolis City Schools website at www.kcs.k12.nc.us.

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